A Child's Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson

A Child's Garden of Verses

subjects: Children: Poetry

Description

Robert Louis Stevenson’s venerated volume of children’s poems has prospered during more than a century in print. Here is a comfortable world of sunny gardens and storybooks, where children play with toy soldiers and imaginary friends. You may remember some of these poems from your own childhood, such as “My Shadow,” “The Swing,” and “The Land of Counterpane”. If time is any judge, this garden of delights will stay a perennial favourite. The 64 poems in A Child’s Garden of Verses are a masterly evocation of childhood from the author of Treasure Island and Kidnapped. They are full of delightful irony, wit and the fantasy worlds of childhood imagination, and introduce for the first time the Land of Nod. But they are also touched with a genuine and gentle pathos at times as they recall a world which seems so far away from us now.

Excerpt

Nothing has ever been written that appeals to a child’s nature more than “A CHILD’S GARDEN OF VERSES.” It is written in a simple verse that a child can readily understand. It was one of the earlier efforts of the author, Robert Louis Stevenson, a Scotchman by birth, who, owing to ill–health, became a world traveler. During his travels he visited the United States, spending a year among our famous resorts. Later he visited Australia and the South Sea Islands, which climate agreed with him to such an extent that he finally settled down and made his home on the island of Samoa. He continued his travels from that point, often visiting the Hawaiian Islands, Australia and New Zealand. He formed a strong friendship for the natives of Samoa, and did a great deal to improve their conditions. He died on the island, and at his own request was buried on the top of one of its beautiful mountains, with the following lines upon his tomb: Here he lies, where he longed to be;