The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle by Beatrix Potter

The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle

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subjects: Children's Picture Books

Description

The Tale of Mrs Tiggy-Winkle tells the tale of a hidden home high in the hills. It is discovered one day by a little girl called Lucie, who is in search of her missing pocket handkerchiefs. She knocks on the tiny door, and meets Mrs Tiggy-winkle who does all the washing and ironing for the neighbouring animals. Lucie spends a lovely day helping her, and it’s only right at the end of the day that she realises Mrs Tiggy-winkle is a hedgehog!


5 pages, with a reading time of ~0.25 hours (1,311 words), and first published in 1905. This DRM-Free edition published by epubBooks, .

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Excerpt

Once upon a time there was a little girl called Lucie, who lived at a farm called Little-town. She was a good little girl–only she was always losing her pocket-handkerchiefs!

One day little Lucie came into the farm-yard crying–oh, she did cry so! “I’ve lost my pocket-handkin! Three handkins and a pinny! Have you seen them, Tabby Kitten?”

The Kitten went on washing her white paws; so Lucie asked a speckled hen–

“Sally Henny-penny, have you found three pocket-handkins?”

But the speckled hen ran into a barn, clucking–

“I go barefoot, barefoot, barefoot!”

And then Lucie asked Cock Robin sitting on a twig.

Cock Robin looked sideways at Lucie with his bright black eye, and he flew over a stile and away.

Lucie climbed upon the stile and looked up at the hill behind Little-town–a hill that goes up–up–into the clouds as though it had no top!

And a great way up the hill-side she thought she saw some white things spread upon the grass.

Lucie scrambled up the hill as fast as her stout legs would carry her; she ran along a steep path-way–up and up–until Little-town was right away down below–she could have dropped a pebble down the chimney!

Presently she came to a spring, bubbling out from the hill-side.

Some one had stood a tin can upon a stone to catch the water–but the water was already running over, for the can was no bigger than an egg-cup! And where the sand upon the path was wet–there were foot-marks of a very small person.

Lucie ran on, and on.