All Around the Moon by Jules Verne

All Around the Moon

Sequel to 'From the Earth to the Moon'

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subjects: Classic Science Fiction

series: Extraordinary Voyages (#7)

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Description

Both From the Earth to the Moon and All Around the Moon (‘Round the Moon) are available together, in a fully illustrated edition, here.

NOTE: this Edward Roth translation has been vilified by Verne scholars for the large amount of additional non-Verne material included.

After being fired out of the giant Columbiad, the bullet-shaped projectile along with its three passengers, Barbicane, Nicholl and Michel Ardan, begins the five-day trip to the moon. After a close collission with meteor the three astronauts discover that the gravitational force of this satellite has sent them into an orbit around the moon. As Barbicane, Ardan and Nicholl begin geographical observations with opera glasses. They gain spectacular views of Tycho, one of the greatest of all craters on the moon. But then the projectile begins to move slowly away from the moon, towards the ‘dead point’, a place of which the gravitational attraction of the moon and earth becomes equal. Michel Ardan then hits upon the idea of using the rockets fixed to the bottom of the projectile, but the rockets are fired too late and the projectile falls to the earth at a speed of 115,200 miles per hour. (source: Wikipedia).


98,455 words, with a reading time of ~ 6 hours (~ 393 pages), and first published in 1870. This DRM-Free edition published by epubBooks, .

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Excerpt

The moment that the great clock belonging to the works at Stony Hill had struck ten, Barbican, Ardan and M’Nicholl began to take their last farewells of the numerous friends surrounding them. The two dogs intended to accompany them had been already deposited in the Projectile. The three travellers approached the mouth of the enormous cannon, seated themselves in the flying car, and once more took leave for the last time of the vast throng standing in silence around them. The windlass creaked, the car started, and the three daring men disappeared in the yawning gulf.

The trap-hole giving them ready access to the interior of the Projectile, the car soon came back empty; the great windlass was presently rolled away; the tackle and scaffolding were removed, and in a short space of time the great mouth of the Columbiad was completely rid of all obstructions.

M’Nicholl took upon himself to fasten the door of the trap on the inside by means of a powerful combination of screws and bolts of his own invention. He also covered up very carefully the glass lights with strong iron plates of extreme solidity and tightly fitting joints.

Ardan’s first care was to turn on the gas, which he found burning rather low; but he lit no more than one burner, being desirous to economize as much as possible their store of light and heat, which, as he well knew, could not at the very utmost last them longer than a few weeks.

Under the cheerful blaze, the interior of the Projectile looked like a comfortable little chamber, with its circular sofa, nicely padded walls, and dome shaped ceiling.

All the articles that it contained, arms, instruments, utensils, etc., were solidly fastened to the projections of the wadding, so as to sustain the least injury possible from the first terrible shock. In fact, all precautions possible, humanly speaking, had been taken to counteract this, the first, and possibly one of the very greatest dangers to which the courageous adventurers would be exposed.

Ardan expressed himself to be quite pleased with the appearance of things in general.

“It’s a prison, to be sure,” said he “but not one of your ordinary prisons that always keep in the one spot. For my part, as long as I can have the privilege of looking out of the window, I am willing to lease it for a hundred years. Ah! Barbican, that brings out one of your stony smiles. You think our lease may last longer than that! Our tenement may become our coffin, eh? Be it so. I prefer it anyway to Mahomet’s; it may indeed float in the air, but it won’t be motionless as a milestone!”

Barbican, having made sure by personal inspection that everything was in perfect order, consulted his chronometer, which he had carefully set a short time before with Chief Engineer Murphy’s, who had been charged to fire off the Projectile.

“Friends,” he said, “it is now twenty minutes past ten. At 10 46’ 40’’, precisely, Murphy will send the electric current into the gun-cotton. We have, therefore, twenty-six minutes more to remain on earth.”

“Twenty-six minutes and twenty seconds,” observed Captain M’Nicholl, who always aimed at mathematical precision.

“Twenty-six minutes!” cried Ardan, gaily. “An age, a cycle, according to the use you make of them. In twenty-six minutes how much can be done! The weightiest questions of warfare, politics, morality, can be discussed, even decided, in twenty-six minutes. Twenty-six minutes well spent are infinitely more valuable than twenty-six lifetimes wasted! A few seconds even, employed by a Pascal, or a Newton, or a Barbican, or any other profoundly intellectual being

Whose thoughts wander through eternity--"

“As mad as Marston! Every bit!” muttered the Captain, half audibly.

“What do you conclude from this rigmarole of yours?” interrupted Barbican.

“I conclude that we have twenty-six good minutes still left–”

“Only twenty-four minutes, ten seconds,” interrupted the Captain, watch in hand.

“Well, twenty-four minutes, Captain,” Ardan went on; “now even in twenty-four minutes, I maintain–”

“Ardan,” interrupted Barbican, “after a very little while we shall have plenty of time for philosophical disputations. Just now let us think of something far more pressing.”

“More pressing! what do you mean? are we not fully prepared?”

“Yes, fully prepared, as far at least as we have been able to foresee. But we may still, I think, possibly increase the number of precautions to be taken against the terrible shock that we are so soon to experience.”

“What? Have you any doubts whatever of the effectiveness of your brilliant and extremely original idea? Don’t you think that the layers of water, regularly disposed in easily-ruptured partitions beneath this floor, will afford us sufficient protection by their elasticity?”

“I hope so, indeed, my dear friend, but I am by no means confident.”